With the launch of our graduate program, the BHER Project has seen the emergence of refugee scholars who are engaging critically with, and writing about, the field of education and refugee/forced migration studies. By offering graduate programs in situ, we hope to build the knowledge, capacity, and academic scholarship of refugees and host community members in Dadaab who will be the agents to directly address the gap of refugee voices in academia.

The vast majority of knowledge and research on refugee and migration issues are published by academics and practitioners from the global north, when 85 percent of displaced persons are living in the global south. There is a significant and concerning underrepresentation of refugee voices in research that directly pertains to them. Our students have been active in seeking opportunities to collaborate, research, and write and the BHER Project works to support the contributions of our students by facilitating their participation in conferences, events, and other writing/research projects. For anyone interested in doing research with BHER, we encourage you to review the reciprocal research engagement document before connecting with us.

As a project, our intent is to develop better reciprocity in research across the global north and south, particularly through opportunities for collaboration and training in research/writing skills for graduate students and researchers in Dadaab. See below for archival lists of research/publications by BHER students, instructors, and partners.

.

.

.